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  • Building your own beverage brand without money

    Salutations all, I have the honour this year to be one of the presenters at this year's Tales of the Cocktail along with the esteemed Adam Elmegirab (of bitters fame) and also pith helmet-wearer-extraordinaire Avery Glasser who does the Bittermens range of bitters and spirits. The topic presented upon is 'Building your own brand without any
    Posted to General Discussion (Forum) by B H Simpson on 1 Jul 2012
  • The Black Cat Martini: Urban Legend or Conceit of Fiction

    Mildly intrigued by a reference in Frank Moorhouse's book Martini: A Memoir to a Black Cat Martini. Apparently, between the wars, there was a bar in Shanghai called The Black Cat. Josephine Baker is reported to have said the martini was invented there in 1928 by Baron Clappique and Andre Malraux. Side-stepping the question of positing a date, place
    Posted to General Discussion (Forum) by B H Simpson on 1 Jul 2012
  • Re: The origins of the Shanghai Cocktail

    Thanks for the link and local insight Seamus After I bit of research I came up with the following blog-post - which details how far I got in my search for the origins of the Shanghai Cocktail (actually further than I had imagined). http://shanghaidrinkersclub.blogspot.co.nz/2012/02/shanghai-cocktail-chinese-puzzle.html Any commentary/feedback welcome
    Posted to Cocktails and Mixology (Forum) by B H Simpson on 1 Mar 2012
  • The origins of the Shanghai Cocktail

    Having recently opened a bottle of French Anisette (which tastes rather like white sambuca) I decided to try out the Shanghai Cocktail from the Savoy Cocktail Book. I was pleasantly surprised to find this to be a tasty drink. I have made this drink in the past, but mistakenly using pastis as an anisette substitute - the resulting drink was overpowered
    Posted to Cocktails and Mixology (Forum) by B H Simpson on 3 Feb 2012
  • Re: How do you keep track of cocktail recipes you've made/want to try?

    Being something of a fan of out-dated modes and methods (as I'm sure many contributors to these forums are) I've always fancied picking up an old Library Card index system, with the ability to search by either cocktail name, base spirit, modifier, style or 'subject' tag (e.g. Hemingway Daiquiri would be filed on five different cards
    Posted to Cocktails and Mixology (Forum) by B H Simpson on 24 Jan 2012
  • Re: David Embury and Yellow Gin

    One assumes the original casks used in the early to mid 1800's to 'create' yellow gin would have been second (or more) refills of sherry, brandy, or maybe wine casks and barrels - does anyone now producing 'Yellow' gin use these cask types? And I am prepared to be wrong but it seems all references to 'Yellow Gin' is in connection
  • Re: Sidecar History and the Sugared Rim

    And perhaps as a parallel question... the earliest use of the salt rim. Sugar seems a fairly easy innovation, but 'salt'? That seems a more counter-intuitive leap. Innovated by whom I wonder?
    Posted to Cocktails and Mixology (Forum) by B H Simpson on 4 Jan 2012
  • Re: What alcohol content is needed to preserve spirits indefinitely?

    There are many factors involved in the preservation of the 'goodness' of any given spirit based beverage. 'Goodness' is usually compromised by the presence and/or activity of bacteria. Alcohol can stop or slow down this action but usually does not act alone. Levels of acidity (such as with citrus based beverages), sugar content (an ancient
  • Re: Six Cylinder cocktail - origins?

    This is one of those handful of cocktails of the era that we know who invented it and when. As David Wondrich notes: "the Six Cylinder won first prize in the Paris Cocktail Championship, held at the Claridge (Paris) on December 2nd, 1928. It was created by Raymond Latour." The recipe is noted in Cocktails de Paris , published not long after
    Posted to Cocktails and Mixology (Forum) by B H Simpson on 29 Aug 2011
  • Re: Six Cylinder cocktail - origins?

    1928 - a good year for six cylinder racing cars (apparently) - particularly at the Le Mans 24hr endurance race... http://www.allpar.com/racing/lemans-1928.html I see in Cocktails de Paris that Latour's recipe calls for 'Cherry-Rocher' (a French liqueur brand that still exists today) which is described as having additional notes of clove
    Posted to Cocktails and Mixology (Forum) by B H Simpson on 24 Aug 2011
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