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The Jerry Thomas Project

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Evo-lution Posted: 3 Feb 2009 1:28 AM

1. PUNCH

2. Brandy Punch
3. Brandy Punch (For a party of twenty)
4. Mississippi Punch
5. Hot Brandy And Rum Punch
6. Irish Whiskey Punch
7. Cold Whiskey Punch
8. Scotch Whiskey Punch
9. Whiskey Punch
10. Gin Punch
11. Gin Punch
12. Champagne Punch
13. Sherry Punch
14. Claret Punch
15. Sauterne Punch
16. Port Wine Punch
17. Vanilla Punch
18. Pine-Apple Punch
19. Orgeat Punch
20. Curaçao Punch
21. Roman Punch
22. Milk Punch
23. Hot Milk Punch
24. English Milk Punch
25. English Milk Punch
26. Punch à la Ford
27. Punch Jelly
28. Gin Punch
29. Glasgow Punch
30. Regent's Punch
31. Regent's Punch
32. Raspberry Punch
33. National Guard 7th Regiment Punch
34. St. Charles' Punch
35. 69th Regiment Punch
36. Louisiana Sugar-House Punch
37. Dry Punch
38. La Patria Punch
39. The Spread Eagle Punch
40. Rochester Punch
41. Imperial Punch
42. Thirty-Second Regiment or Victoria Punch
43. Rocky Mountain Punch
44. Punch Grassot
45. Light Guard Punch
46. Philadelphia Fish-House Punch*
47. Non-Such Punch
48. Canadian Punch
49. Tip-Top Punch
50. Arrack (No recipe as such)
51. Arrack Punch
52. Arrack Punch
53. Bimbo Punch
54. Cold Punch
55. Nuremburgh Punch
56. United Service Punch
57. Ruby Punch
58. Royal Punch
59. Century Club Punch
60. Duke Of Norfolk Punch
61. Queen Punch
62. Gothic Punch
63. Oxford Punch
64. Uncle Toby Punch
65. Capillaire
66. Capillaire
67. Punch à la Romaine
68. Tea Punch
69. West Indian Punch
70. Barbadoes Punch
71. Yorkshire Punch
72. Apple Punch
73. Ale Punch
74. Cider Punch
75. Nectar Punch
76. Orange Punch
77. Imperial Raspberry Whiskey Punch
78. Kirschwasser Punch
79. D'Orsay Punch

80. EGG NOGG

81. Egg Nogg
82. Hot Egg Nogg
83. Egg Nogg
84. Baltimore Egg Nogg
85. General Harrison's Egg Nogg
86. Sherry Egg Nogg

87. JULEPS

88. Mint Julep
89. Brandy Julep
90. Gin Julep
91. Whiskey Julep
92. Pineapple Julep

93. THE SMASH

94. Brandy Smash
95. Gin Smash
96. Whiskey Smash

97. THE COBBLER

98. Sherry Cobbler
99. Champagne Cobbler
100. Catawba Cobbler
101. Hock Cobbler
102. Claret Cobbler
103. Sauterne Cobbler
104. Whiskey Cobbler

105. THE COCKTAIL & CRUSTA

106. Bottle Cocktail
107. Brandy Cocktail
108. Fancy Brandy Cocktail
109. Whiskey Cocktail
110. Champagne Cocktail
111. Gin Cocktail
112. Fancy Gin Cocktail
113. Japanese Cocktail
114. Jersey Cocktail
115. Soda Cocktail
116. Brandy Crusta
117. Whiskey Crusta
118. Gin Crusta

119. MULLS AND SANGAREES

120. Mulled Wine Without Eggs
121. Mulled Wine With Eggs
122. Mulled Wine
123. Mulled Wine
124. Mulled Claret
125. Port Wine Sangaree
126. Sherry Sangaree
127. Brandy Sangaree
128. Gin Sangaree
129. Ale Sangaree
130. Porter Sangaree


131. TODDIES AND SLINGS

132. Apple Toddy
133. Brandy Toddy
134. Whiskey Toddy
135.Gin Toddy
136. Brandy Sling
137. Hot Whiskey Sling
138. Gin Sling

139. FIXES AND SOURS

140. Brandy Fix**
141. Gin Fix
142. Brandy Sour
143. Gin Sour***

144. FLIP, NEGUS AND SHRUB

145. Rum Flip
146. Rum Flip
147. Ale Flip
148. Egg Flip
149. Egg Flip
150. Brandy Flip
151. Port Wine Negus
152. Port Wine Negus
153. Soda Negus
154. Cherry Shrub
155. White Currant Shrub
156. Currant Shrub
157. Raspberry Shrub
158. Brandy Shrub
159. Rum Shrub
160. English Rum Shrub

161. FANCY DRINKS

162. Santina's Pousse Cafe
163. Parisian Pousse Cafe
164. Faivre's Pousse Cafe
165. Pousse l'Amour
166. Brandy Champerelle
167. Brandy Scaffa
168. Sleeper
169. Claret And Champagne Cup, à la Brunow
170. Ratafias
171. Balaklava Nectar
172. Crimean Cup, à la Marmora
173. Crimean Cup, à la Wyndham
174. Tom And Jerry
175. White Tiger's Milk****
176. White Lion
177. Locomotive
178. Bishop
179. Bishop
180. Archbishop
181. Cardinal
182. Pope
183. A Bishop
184. Knickerbocker
185. Rumfustian
186. Claret Cup
187. Porter Cup
187. Porter Cup
188. English Curaçao
189. Italian Lemonade
190. Quince Liqueur
191. Claret Cup, or Mulled Claret
192. Bottled Velvet
193. Champagne, Hock or Chablis Cup
194. Cider Nectar
195. Badminton

196. MISCELLANEOUS DRINKS

197. Blue Blazer
198. "Jerry Thomas" Own Decanter Bitters
199. Burnt Brandy And peach
200. Black Stripe
201 Peach And Honey
202. Gin And Pine
203. Gin And Tansy
204. Gin And Wormwood
205. Scotch Whiskey Skin
206. Columbia Skin
207. Hot Spiced Rum
208. Hot Rum
209. Stone Fence
210. Absinthe
211. Rhine Wine And Seltzer-Water
212. "Arf And Arf"
213. Brandy Straight
214. Gin Straight
215. Pony Brandy
216. Brandy And Soda
217. Brandy And Gum
218. Sherry And Egg
219. Sherry And Bitters
220. Sherry And Ice

221. TEMPERANCE DRINKS

222. Lemonade
223. Plain Lemonade
224. Lemonade
225. Orangeade
226. Orgeat Lemonade
227. Ginger Lemonade
228. Soda Nectar
229. Drink For The Dog Days
230. Sherbet
231. Lemonade Powders
232. Draught Lemonade, or Lemon Sherbet
233. Imperial Drink For Families
234. Nectar
235. Raspberry, Strawberry, Currant, or Orange Effervescing Draughts
236. Ginger Wine

*Mixture
**Santa Cruz Fix
***Santa Cruz Sour
****Aromatic Tincture
*****Raspberry Syrup

*PLEASE NOTE THIS LIST OF RECIPES WILL UNDOUBTEDLY GROW AS I PROGRESS THROUGH THE BOOK, TAKING INTO ACCOUNT RECIPES FOR SYRUPS, BITTERS, ETC. 

CLICKING THE DRINK WILL ALSO TAKE YOU TO ITS PLACE IN THE THREAD AS WELL.

Consultancy, training and events - www.evo-lution.org

Boker's Bitters and Dandelion & Burdock Bitters - www.bokersbitters.co.uk

The Jerry Thomas Project - www.thejerrythomasproject.blogspot.com

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Evo-lution replied on 3 Feb 2009 1:30 AM

Table of Measurements

1 quart (imperial) = 40 ounces
1 quart (wine) = 32 ounces
1 bottle = 24 ounces
1 pint (imperial) = 20 ounces
1 pint (wine) = 16 ounces
1/2 pint (imperial) = 10 ounces
1/2 pint (wine) = 8 ounces
1 gill (imperial) = 5 ounces
1 wineglass = 2 ounces
1 jigger = 1 wineglass (also 1 1/2 ounce or 1 1/4 ounce)
1 pony = 1 ounce
1 tablespoon = 1/2 ounce
1 teaspoon = 1/3 or 1/2 tablespoon
1 dash = 1 dash

You'll also notice in the recipes the use of the word 'do.', this was an early way of saying 'ditto'.

[Thanks go to Dave Wondrich for the above information]

Consultancy, training and events - www.evo-lution.org

Boker's Bitters and Dandelion & Burdock Bitters - www.bokersbitters.co.uk

The Jerry Thomas Project - www.thejerrythomasproject.blogspot.com

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Evo-lution replied on 3 Feb 2009 1:30 AM

The 78 punch recipes that can be found in Jerry Thomas' 'Bar Tender's Guide - How To Mix Drinks; or, The Bon Vivant's Companion', are preceded by the following piece of advice with regards the preparation of punch.

1. Punch

To make punch of any sort in perfection, the ambrosial essence of the lemon must be extracted by rubbing lumps of sugar on the rind, which breaks the delicate little vessels that contain the essence, and at the same time absorbs it.  This, and making the mixture sweet and strong, using tea instead of water, and thoroughly amalgamating all the compounds, so that the taste of neither the bitter, the sweet, the spirit, nor the element, shall be perceptible one over the other is the grand secret, only to be acquired by practice.

In making hot toddy, or hot punch, you must put in the spirits before the water: in cold punch, grog, &c., the other way.

The precise portions of spirit and water, or even of the acidity and sweetness, can have no general rule, as scarcely two persons make punch alike.

Consultancy, training and events - www.evo-lution.org

Boker's Bitters and Dandelion & Burdock Bitters - www.bokersbitters.co.uk

The Jerry Thomas Project - www.thejerrythomasproject.blogspot.com

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Evo-lution replied on 3 Feb 2009 1:31 AM

The first drink from Jerry's book is the Brandy Punch. 

It's widely believed that punches were discovered by the British in India sometime during the 16th century.  The name 'Punch' is derived from the Indian word for five, 'panch', and is believed to refer to the five ingredients that made up the completed beverage; tea, arrack, sugar, lemons and water.  As with most stories surrounding mixed beverages, this has many variations, which is not surprising as there's rarely someone around sober enough to keep track/note of what's going on. Wink

Whatever the truth regarding the exact origins of punch, it makes sense that 'punch' would have made its way over to English colonies that were settling in the New World (before America became America), from those that had settled in India. 

It is known for sure that it made its way across to the other side of the globe before the 1700s, with references dating as far back as 1682.   One such reference, from 1757, is attributed to an 'S.M of Boston', believed to be Samuel Mather, the son of Cotton Mather, a minister from New England .  A box of lemons was sent to Sir Harry Frankland, along with the following verse:-

"You know from Eastern India came
The skill of making punch as did the name.
And as the name consists of letters five,
By five ingredients is it kept alive.
To purest water sugar must be joined,
With these the grateful acid is combined.
Some any sours they get contented use,
But men of taste do that from Tagus choose.
When now these three are mixed with care
Then added be of spirit a small share.
And that you may the drink quite perfect see,
Atop the musky nut must grated be."

Fast forward 100 years, and Punches were big, big business in America, which is apparent when you consider that a third of Jerry's book is devoted to punches (236 recipes, 79 punches).  At the time, every bar was serving it, and every bartender was making it their own way.  Jerry alludes to this in the passage above where he says, "The precise portions of spirit and water, or even of the acidity and sweetness, can have no general rule, as scarcely two persons make punch alike."  I guess you could say this was an early form of bartender rivalry, where true mixological skill would separate the good from the bad...

Consultancy, training and events - www.evo-lution.org

Boker's Bitters and Dandelion & Burdock Bitters - www.bokersbitters.co.uk

The Jerry Thomas Project - www.thejerrythomasproject.blogspot.com

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Evo-lution replied on 5 Feb 2009 11:03 AM

So, the three days are up, and the syrup is completed, just waiting for it to cool overnight then I'll make the punch tomorrow (with pictures).

The fermentation process started yesterday, so thought I'd leave it for the full three days as per the recipe in the book.  Left it on the stove on a really light simmer for approximately one hour until it reached the 'little pearl' stage.  The completed syrup is intensely rich, and has a pronounced flavour that still manages to retain a 'freshness' or 'zing' that I guessed it would lose.

I assume that the intensity of the syrup's flavour comes from the fermentation process, which converts the sugars to acids, although I'd be interested to find out more about this.

Consultancy, training and events - www.evo-lution.org

Boker's Bitters and Dandelion & Burdock Bitters - www.bokersbitters.co.uk

The Jerry Thomas Project - www.thejerrythomasproject.blogspot.com

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Something tells me that this recipe is a tad more involved than those in the Savoy :->

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How do you know fermentation is taking place? And at what point is it just... for lack of a better term rotten or moldy?

Rich

Now that the new-born is no longer "new" and more importantly sleeping, I'm back at it!

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Fermentation converts sugar to alcohol, not acid. As the sugar is converted to alcohol the acids in the fruit will become more apparent.

The other thing that happening and is referred to in the recipe is that the pectin is degraded and the resulting juice won't jell.

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"Something tells me that this recipe is a tad more involved than those in the Savoy :->"

Heh, Robert! 

You'd think, but it's about as complicated as manufacturing Swedish Punsch, Kina Lillet, Amer Picon, or some of the things I've tried to do to replicate Hercules.

After all, my Swedish Punch recipe is a combination of Jerry Thomas' Imperial Arrack Punch and his United Service Punch.

But, to defend Mr. Craddock's honor, there are recipes for shrubs, punches, and bottled cocktails at the back of The Savoy Cocktail Book that are just as complicated as almost anything Mr. Thomas espouses.  Well, except maybe those 19th Century Jello Shots, whatever he calls them.

;-)

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Thanks but, how do you know the sugar is converted to alcohol? You taste it for acidity? Use an acid test stick (the name escapes me)?

Now that the new-born is no longer "new" and more importantly sleeping, I'm back at it!

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Quite interesting Adam!

I'm a bit confused about the reason or nature of the fermentation here.

With as little sugar as raspberries have, there's no way that that this little time is probably going to result in much alcohol production.  I think what you'll end up is closer to a natural vinegar.  The recipe sounds more like a concentrated and sweetened raspberry shrub, to me, than a raspberry wine.

Very different from modern raspberry syrup, I imagine!

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Evo-lution replied on 6 Feb 2009 5:33 AM

Robert Hess:
Something tells me that this recipe is a tad more involved than those in the Savoy :->

And this is only the first drink as well. Surprise

JerseyRED:
How do you know fermentation is taking place?

I can't be 100% sure that fermentation is/was taking place, but nearing the third day there was some foam/bubbles forming on the top of the raspberries which I put down to fermentation?

Having tasted it at this point and also at day three (before it was simmered), there was an obvious change in flavour, which was much more intense/pronounced.

Calamityville:
Fermentation converts sugar to alcohol, not acid. As the sugar is converted to alcohol the acids in the fruit will become more apparent.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was under the impression that acid (acetic?!?) may crop up in the process, and assumed this was the reason for the intense flavour.

Erik Ellestad:
Quite interesting Adam!

I'm a bit confused about the reason or nature of the fermentation here.

With as little sugar as raspberries have, there's no way that that this little time is probably going to result in much alcohol production.  I think what you'll end up is closer to a natural vinegar.  The recipe sounds more like a concentrated and sweetened raspberry shrub, to me, than a raspberry wine.

Very different from modern raspberry syrup, I imagine!

Wouldn't the speed of the fermentation be down to the fact there's little sugar in the raspberries?  Again, I'm just speculating here as this isn't necessarily where my expertise lies.

I wish from a 'scientific' viewpoint that I was able to test the raspberries throughout the three days, however I may be able to do this at a later stage as I'll have to make more raspberry syrup, so if someone to tell me how I would go about doing this it'd be much appreciated!  All these questions for a simple raspberry syrup. Tongue Tied

It would be good if some others were to get their hands on some raspberries, mash them up, store them somewhere warm, and see what sort of result they get after a few days...

As I said from the outset, I'm going to learn a lot through-out the completion of this project, and a lot of the information I gather will come from the contributors on e-Gullet, Barbore and The Chanticleer Society.  Theoretically, the project will be completed as a collective with everyone chipping in with various information and help.

Consultancy, training and events - www.evo-lution.org

Boker's Bitters and Dandelion & Burdock Bitters - www.bokersbitters.co.uk

The Jerry Thomas Project - www.thejerrythomasproject.blogspot.com

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Evo-lution:

All these questions for a simple raspberry syrup. Tongue Tied

That's too funny! I'll have to follow things over at e-Gullet as well.

Thanks for the answers and best of luck!

Now that the new-born is no longer "new" and more importantly sleeping, I'm back at it!

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Evo-lution replied on 6 Feb 2009 8:16 AM

Calamityville:
Fermentation converts sugar to alcohol, not acid. As the sugar is converted to alcohol the acids in the fruit will become more apparent.

Taken the following from the thread on e-Gullet

slkinsey:
In a sugar-rich environment like this, the lactobacilli eat sugars and excrete acid.  For sure, fermentation by lactobacilli will increase acidity (I should also point out that their activity is also largely halted beyond a certain pH).  But, you know... all the microorganisms in there will eat a little bit of most things in the mash.

Consultancy, training and events - www.evo-lution.org

Boker's Bitters and Dandelion & Burdock Bitters - www.bokersbitters.co.uk

The Jerry Thomas Project - www.thejerrythomasproject.blogspot.com

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Evo-lution replied on 6 Feb 2009 10:04 AM

The first stage in the construction of the Brandy Punch (and Gin Punch) is making a good quality raspberry syrup.  To try and stay true to the drinks of the time, the recipe I'll be following can be found in Prof. Christian Schultz's section of the book 'Manual for the Manufacture of Cordial, Liquors, Fancy Syrups, 7c. 7c.'.

422. Raspberry Syrup

2 pints of filtered raspberry juice
4 1/2lbs of sugar

Select the fruit, either white or red.  Having picked them over, mash them in a pan, which put in a warm place until fermentation has commenced.  Let it stand for about three days.  All mucilaginous fruits require this, or else they would jelly when bottled.  Now filter the juice through a close flannel bag, or blotting-paper, and add sugar in the proportion mentioned above; this had better be powdered.  Place the syrup on the fire, and as it heats skim it carefully, but don't let it boil; or you may mix in a glass vessel or earthenware jar, and place in a pan of water on the fire.  This is a very clean way, and prevents the sides crusting and burning.  When dissolved to the 'little pearl' (see No. 12) take it off; strain through a cloth; bottle when cold; cover with tissue-paper dipped in brandy and tie down with a bladder.

12. Little Pearl

This is when you separate the thumb and finger, and the fine thread reaches, without breaking, from one to the other.

2. Brandy Punch

(Use large bar glass)

1 tablespoonful raspberry syrup (1/2 ounce)
2 do. white sugar (1 ounce)
1 wine-glass water (2 ounce)
1 1/2 do. brandy (3 ounce - Hennessy Fine de Cognac 40% ABV)
1/2 small sized lemon
2 slices of orange
1 piece of pineapple

Fill the tumbler with shaved ice, shake well, and dress the top with berries in season; sip through a straw.

Method: Squeeze lemon into glass, add water, sugar and stir until dissolved.  Add raspberry syrup and brandy, fill with cracked ice and roll back and forth between glass and shaker until well mixed.
Glass: Boston
Garnish: Orange slices, piece of pineapple and fresh raspberries
Ice: Cracked ice
Notes: The fruit in the recipe is not specified to be included in the drink, and going by the picture in the book, the fruit is used as a garnish instead that was probably eaten alongside the drink.  If you wanted you could shake the fruit in the drink but this would result in an unpleasant looking drink, as well as being over-diluted from the cracked ice.

A decent drink with blackcurrant and lemon on the nose.  The flavour of the raspberry syrup doesn't seem to carry through very well in this drink, I just don't think the balance is right.  Not a bad effort, but one that goes down as 'must do better'.

If I was to make this drink again, I'd be inclined to raise the level of the raspberry syrup and cut back on the sugar a little.  I'd also be inclined to use tea instead of water, I think that would make a huge difference.

Consultancy, training and events - www.evo-lution.org

Boker's Bitters and Dandelion & Burdock Bitters - www.bokersbitters.co.uk

The Jerry Thomas Project - www.thejerrythomasproject.blogspot.com

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